How The Build Back Better Act Could Benefit Key States

Arizona

Child Care

  • The average cost of child care in Arizona is $9,395 per year; families with two young children spend 24% of their yearly income on child care.
  • Arizona’s lack of affordable child care options contributes to a 26.7% gender gap in workforce participation between mothers and fathers. 
  • Investing in better child care would create and support an estimated 21,240 new jobs over 10 years in Arizona. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would provide child care access to about 430,000 low-income Arizona children, and ensure families pay no more than 7% of their income for high-quality child care. 
  • Arizona married and single parents could save on average up to $9,400 a year on child care costs.  

Elder Care + Home & Community Based Services (HCBS)

Universal Pre-K

  • Only about 23% of Arizona 3- and 4-year-olds have access to publicly-funded preschool; preschool in Arizona costs about $8,600 per year for those who can’t access a publicly-funded program. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would allow Arizona to expand access to free preschool for over 134,000 additional 3- and 4-year-olds, and improve the quality of preschool for those already enrolled. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would raise wages for child care and pre-k workers, leading to an overall increase in wages of $5.7 million to these Arizona workers. 

Clean Energy

Higher Education 

  • Average cost of a 2-year degree in Arizona is $2,591 per year, and $11,816 a year for a 4-year degree. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would increase Pell Grant awards by $550 for the 112,180 Arizona students who rely on them. 

Paid Leave

Child Hunger

Housing

Health Care

Prescription Drugs

Child Tax Credit + Earned Income Tax Credit 

  • The Build Back Better Act would also continue to provide up to $1,500 in tax cuts for 385,200 working Arizonans by extending the expanded Earned Income Tax Credit. 

 

West Virginia

Child Care

  • The average cost of child care in West Virginia is $5,871 per year; families with two young children spend 22% of their yearly income on child care.
  • West Virginia’s lack of affordable child care options contributes to a 19.8% gender gap in workforce participation between mothers and fathers. 
  • Investing in better child care would create and support an estimated 6,010 new jobs over 10 years in West Virginia. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would provide child care access to about 94,170 low-income West Virginia children, and ensure families pay no more than 7% of their income for high-quality child care. 
  • West Virginia married parents could save on average up to $5,750 a year on child care costs; single parents could save up to $5,850 a year.  

Elder Care + Home & Community Based Services (HCBS)

Universal Pre-K

  • Only about 25% of West Virginia 3- and 4-year-olds have access to publicly-funded preschool; preschool in West Virginia costs about $8,600 per year for those who can’t access a publicly-funded program. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would allow West Virginia to expand access to free preschool for over 27,753 additional 3- and 4-year-olds, and improve the quality of preschool for those already enrolled. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would raise wages for child care and pre-k workers, leading to an overall increase in wages of $5.4 million to these West Virginia workers. 

Clean Energy

Higher Education 

  • Average cost of a 2-year degree in West Virginia is $4,413 per year, and $8,733 a year for a 4-year degree. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would increase Pell Grant awards by $550 for the 25,206 West Virginia students who rely on them. 

Paid Leave

Child Hunger

Housing

Health Care

Prescription Drugs

Child Tax Credit + Earned Income Tax Credit 

  • The Build Back Better Act would also continue to provide up to $1,500 in tax cuts for 103,000 working West Virginians by extending the expanded Earned Income Tax Credit.

 

Pennsylvania

Child Care

  • The average cost of child care in Pennsylvania is $11,402 per year; families with two young children spend 22% of their yearly income on child care.
  • Pennsylvania’s lack of affordable child care options contributes to a 15% gender gap in workforce participation between mothers and fathers. 
  • Investing in better child care could create and support an estimated 22,300 new jobs over 10 years in Pennsylvania. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would provide child care access to about 710,000 low-income Pennsylvania children, and ensure families pay no more than 7% of their income for high-quality child care. 
  • Pennsylvania married and single parents could save on average up to $11,400 a year on child care costs.  

Elder Care + Home & Community Based Services (HCBS)

Universal Pre-K

  • Only about 17% of Pennsylvania 3- and 4-year-olds have access to publicly-funded preschool; preschool in Pennsylvania costs about $8,600 per year for those who can’t access a publicly-funded program. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would allow Pennsylvania to expand access to free preschool for over 199,580 additional 3- and 4-year-olds, and improve the quality of preschool for those already enrolled. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would raise wages for child care and pre-k workers, leading to an overall increase in wages of $115.3 million to these Pennsylvania workers. 

Clean Energy

Higher Education 

  • Average cost of a 2-year degree in Pennsylvania is $5,625 per year, and $15,312 a year for a 4-year degree. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would increase Pell Grant awards by $550 for the 160,211 Pennsylvania students who rely on them. 

Paid Leave

Child Hunger

 

Housing

Health Care

Prescription Drugs

Child Tax Credit + Earned Income Tax Credit 

  • The Build Back Better Act would also continue to provide up to $1,500 in tax cuts for 663,000 working Pennsylvanians by extending the expanded Earned Income Tax Credit.

 

New Hampshire

Child Care

  • The average cost of child care in New Hampshire is $12,416 per year; families with two young children spend 21% of their yearly income on child care.
  • New Hampshire’s lack of affordable child care options contributes to a 15.8% gender gap in workforce participation between mothers and fathers. 
  • Investing in better child care would create and support an estimated 1,600 new jobs over 10 years in New Hampshire. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would provide child care access to about 70,000 low-income New Hampshire children, and ensure families pay no more than 7% of their income for high-quality child care. 
  • New Hampshire married and single parents could save on average up to $12,400 a year on child care costs.  

Elder Care + Home & Community Based Services (HCBS)

Universal Pre-K

  • Only about 13% of New Hampshire 3- and 4-year-olds have access to publicly-funded preschool; preschool in New Hampshire costs about $8,600 per year for those who can’t access a publicly-funded program. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would allow New Hampshire to expand access to free preschool for over 24,091 additional 3- and 4-year-olds, and improve the quality of preschool for those already enrolled. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would raise wages for child care and pre-k workers, leading to an overall increase in wages of $10.3 million to these New Hampshire workers. 

Clean Energy

Higher Education 

  • Average cost of a 2-year degree in New Hampshire is $7,095 per year, and $17,038 a year for a 4-year degree. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would increase Pell Grant awards by $550 for the 82,727 New Hampshire students who rely on them. 

Paid Leave

Child Hunger

Housing

Health Care

Prescription Drugs

Child Tax Credit + Earned Income Tax Credit 

  • The Build Back Better Act would also continue to provide up to $1,500 in tax cuts for 66,400 working New Hampshire residents by extending the expanded Earned Income Tax Credit.

 

Wisconsin

Child Care

  • The average cost of child care in Wisconsin is $10,332 per year; families with two young children spend 20% of their yearly income on child care.
  • Wisconsin’s lack of affordable child care options contributes to a 17% gender gap in workforce participation between mothers and fathers. 
  • Investing in better child care would create and support an estimated 11,800 new jobs over 10 years in Wisconsin. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would provide child care access to about 359,321 low-income Wisconsin children, and ensure families pay no more than 7% of their income for high-quality child care. 
  • Wisconsin married parents could save on average up to $12,700 a year on child care costs; single parents could save up to $12,750 a year.  

Elder Care + Home & Community Based Services (HCBS)

Universal Pre-K

  • Only about 29% of Wisconsin 3- and 4-year-olds have access to publicly-funded preschool; preschool in Wisconsin costs about $8,600 per year for those who can’t access a publicly-funded program. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would allow Wisconsin to expand access to free preschool for over 84,748 additional 3- and 4-year-olds, and improve the quality of preschool for those already enrolled. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would raise wages for child care and pre-k workers, leading to an overall increase in wages of $37.4 million to these Wisconsin workers. 

Clean Energy

Higher Education 

  • Average cost of a 2-year degree in Wisconsin is $4,661 per year, and $9,162 a year for a 4-year degree. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would increase Pell Grant awards by $550 for the 78,304 Wisconsin students who rely on them. 

Paid Leave

Child Hunger

Housing

Health Care

Prescription Drugs

Child Tax Credit + Earned Income Tax Credit 

  • The Build Back Better Act would also continue to provide up to $1,500 in tax cuts for 304,000 working Wisconsin residents by extending the expanded Earned Income Tax Credit.

 

Nevada

Child Care

  • The average cost of child care in Nevada is $10,238 per year; families with two young children would spend 25% of their yearly income on child care.
  • Nevada’s lack of affordable child care options contributes to a 21.9% gender gap in workforce participation between mothers and fathers. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would provide child care access to about 196,000 low-income Nevada children, and ensure families pay no more than 7% of their income for high-quality child care. 
  • Nevada married and single parents could save on average up to $10,250 a year on child care costs.  

Universal Pre-K

  • Only about 17% of Nevada 3- and 4-year-olds have access to publicly-funded preschool; preschool in Nevada costs about $8,600 per year for those who can’t access a publicly-funded program. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would allow Nevada to expand access to free preschool for over 65,000 additional 3- and 4-year-olds, and improve the quality of preschool for those already enrolled. 

Clean Energy

Higher Education 

  • Average cost of a 2-year degree in Nevada is $3,803 per year, and $8,548 a year for a 4-year degree. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would increase Pell Grant awards by $550 for the 31,636 Nevada students who rely on them. 

Paid Leave

Child Hunger

Housing

Health Care

  • The Build Back Better Act would close the Medicaid coverage gap, and help 71,000 uninsured Nevadans get health care coverage. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would also extend premium tax credits so that 47,100 Nevadans can continue to save hundreds of dollars a year on premium costs, a national average of $600
  • The Build Back Better Act could also lead to guaranteed or expanded Medicare coverage of hearing benefits for an estimated 544,000 Nevadans.

Prescription Drugs

Child Tax Credit + Earned Income Tax Credit 

  • The Build Back Better Act would also continue to provide up to $1,500 in tax cuts for 175,300 working Nevadans by extending the expanded Earned Income Tax Credit. 

 

Georgia

Child Care

  • The average cost of child care in Georgia is $7,500 per year; families with two young children spend 8% of their yearly income on child care.
  • Georgia’s lack of affordable child care options contributes to a 19% gender gap in workforce participation between mothers and fathers. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would provide child care access to about 630,000 low-income Georgia children, and ensure families pay no more than 7% of their income for high-quality child care. 
  • Georgia married and single parents could save on average up to $7,500 a year on child care costs.  

Universal Pre-K

  • Only about 30% of Georgia 3- and 4-year-olds have access to publicly-funded preschool; preschool in Georgia costs about $8,600 per year for those who can’t access a publicly-funded program. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would allow Georgia to expand access to free preschool for over 183,000 additional 3- and 4-year-olds, and improve the quality of preschool for those already enrolled. 

Clean Energy

Higher Education 

  • Average cost of a 2-year degree in Georgia is $4,026 per year, and $8,885 a year for a 4-year degree. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would increase Pell Grant awards by $550 for the 195,247 Georgia students who rely on them. 

Paid Leave

Child Hunger

Housing

Health Care

  • The Build Back Better Act would close the Medicaid coverage gap, and help 548,000 uninsured Georgians get health care coverage. 
  • The Build Back Better Act would also extend premium tax credits so that 262,000 Georgians can continue to save hundreds of dollars a year on premium costs, a national average of $600. 
  • The Build Back Better Act could also lead to guaranteed or expanded Medicare coverage of hearing benefits for an estimated 1.7 million Georgians.

Prescription Drugs

Child Tax Credit + Earned Income Tax Credit